Polytechnic University of Valencia Congress, ILASS2017 - 28th European Conference on Liquid Atomization and Spray Systems

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Where does the drop size distribution come from?
Romain Canu, Christophe Dumouchel, Benjamin Duret, Mohamed Essadki, Marc Massot, Thibault Ménard, Stefano Puggelli, Julien Reveillon, François-Xavier Demoulin

Last modified: 19-07-2017

Abstract


This study employs DNS of two-phase flows to enhance primary atomization understanding and modelling to beused in numerical simulation in RANS or LES framework. In particular, the work has been aimed at improving the information on the liquid-gas interface evolution available inside the Eulerian-Lagrangian Spray Atomization (ELSA) framework. Even though this approach has been successful to describe the complete liquid atomization process from the primary region to the dilute spray, major improvements are expected on the establishment of the drop size distribution (DSD). Indeed, the DSD is easily defined once the spray is formed, but its appearance and even the mathematical framework to describe its creation during the initial breakup of the continuous liquid phase in a set of individual liquid parcels is missing. This is the main aim of the present work to review proposals to achieve a continuous description of the DSD formation during the atomization process.The attention is here focused on the extraction from DNS data of the behaviour of geometrical variable of the liquid- gas interface, such as the mean and Gauss surface curvatures. A DNS database on curvature evolution has been generated. A Rayleigh-Plateau instability along a column of liquid is considered to analyse and to verify the capabilities of the code in correctly predicting the curvature distribution. A statistical analysis on the curvatures data, in terms of probability density function, was performed in order to determine the physical parameters that control the curvatures on this test case. Two different methods are presented to compute the curvature distribution and in addition, the probability to be at a given distance of the interface is studied. This approach finally links the new toolsproposed to follow the formation of the spray with the pioneering work done on scale distribution analysis.

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.4995/ILASS2017.2017.4706


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